Category Archives: Uncategorized

Innovators Nation conference at ESCP Europe: the conclusion

As a conclusion to this trip to Israel, we decided to organize an event to thank all our partners. The students invited all the people involved in this project (and all the people interested in innovation in Israel) to a conference and a cocktail at ESCP Europe. The event took place on May the 23rd and we were happy to welcome our prestigious guests: Arie Avidor (Minister, Israeli Ambassy in France), Pascal Morand (Dean of ESCP Europe), Daniel Rouach (professor at ESCP Europe), François Fourcade (professor at ESCP Europe) and many others.

The purpose of this conference was to explain why we decided to visit this country, what we discovered and what are the key factors of success of innovation in Israel.

This event has been very successfull, and we hope this kind of project will be organized again at ESCP Europe or in other schools.

You can watch extracts from the conference here:

And here is the full version video we have made to summarize the Innovators Nation adventure (thanks Shannon for the montage!):

We hope you enjoyed reading this blog.

THE END.

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Shabbat in Jerusalem and departure day

On Saturday, our last day in Israel, it was shabbat. We didn’t scheduled anything, so some of us decided to sleep late in the morning (after all, it was well-deserved!), others wanted to buy some souvenirs, and others went to the old city again, to see the rampart’s walk.

There is a lot of choice for buying souvenirs in the old city: kippas, Armenian ceramics, jewelry, rosary, etc.

kippas, Jerusalem

kippas, Jerusalem

The rampart's walk, Jerusalem

The rampart's walk, Jerusalem

After this last walk in Jerusalem, we all get on the minibus. Direction: the airport. After a long wait at the security check, we changed shekels into euros, and we boarded.

We had a stop in Munich, and a few hours later we landed in cold and rainy Paris (after the worst landing we ever had, we almost died!).

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Day 7: what we have seen or learned in Jerusalem

Here is a list of what we have seen or learned today in Jerusalem:

  • The tramway isn’t working during shabbat. And everything is closed. The city looks empty.
  • They are not kidding in the airport. Security check is long and serious: the airport employees ask questions about your luggage, and then they x-ray it, and then they can open it if there is something unusual.

The anecdote of the day:

You can enjoy the best fresh orange juices in Israel. Oranges are produced in Jaffa. You can buy fresh juice in the street, it will be pressed just in front of you. Perfect when the wether is hot and you want something sweet.

Israeli oranges

Israeli oranges

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A lunch at Mahane Yehuda Market

After visiting Yad Vashem, we needed something to cheer us up. So we went to Mahane Yehuda Market to have lunch.

Mahane Yehuda Market: the crowd

Mahane Yehuda Market: the crowd

It’s a lively and overcrowded place where you can find almost everything for cooking and eating: fruits, vegetables, meat, fish, spices, dried fruits and pastries, yummy!

Mahane Yehuda Market: spices

Mahane Yehuda Market: spices

We had some falafel sandwiches. It was fat and tasty! After that we were ready for a long walk in the old city of Jerusalem.

Sophie, Alice and Virginie eating falafel sandwiches in Mahane Yehuda Market

Sophie, Alice and Virginie eating falafel sandwiches in Mahane Yehuda Market

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Day 6: what we have seen or learned in Jerusalem

Here is a list of what we have seen or learned today in Jerusalem:

  • everything is built thanks to donations: universities, research institutes, memorials
  • there are more policemen in Jerusalem than in Tel Aviv.
  • people are always controlled in the tramway (don’t forget your ticket!)
  • for shabbat (resting day in the Jewish tradition), orthodox Jews wear bigger hats.
  • some people really make a pilgrimage to Jerusalem.
  • you have to bargain when buying souvenirs in the old city.
  • men and women are separated on the Western Wall.
  • you can visit a catholic church when hearing the muezzin‘s call to prayer.
  • 10 minutes in Jerusalem worth less than 10 minutes in Tel Aviv: distances are shorter.
  • even if you’re not Jewish, you have to wear a kippa to go to the Western Wall (for men only).
  • during shabbat, you can’t eat before food is blessed.
An othodox Jew in front of the Western Wall, Jerusalem

An othodox Jew in front of the Western Wall, Jerusalem

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Day 5: what we have seen or learned in the Dead Sea

Here is a list of what we have seen or learned today in the Dead Sea:

  • Israel is the country of wifi. You can find a free hotspot almost everywhere.
  • “the dead sea is dead” quoting Ricardo. Actually it’s so salted that no fishes or plants can live in the water.
  • To celebrate the end of Independence day in Israel, people organize picnic with their family.
  • there is a big business in beauty creams made with Dead Sea minerals or mud.
  • people really float in the Dead Sea, it’s not a myth.
  • we have seen a Better Place station (where you can switch your electric car battery) on the road between Tel Aviv and the Dead Sea.

The anecdote of the day: so much sun!

We used more solar cream in one day in the Dead Sea than in one summer month in Paris, no kidding!

The Innovators Nation Team floating in the Dead Sea

The Innovators Nation Team floating in the Dead Sea

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Having a break in Gordon beach

After visiting Procter&Gamble (see article there) and the Hive, we decided to have a break on Gordon beach. It’s located just in front of Tel Aviv, so that when you are swimming, you can have a great view on the city and the buildings.

Gordon beach, Tel Aviv

Gordon beach, Tel Aviv

Then, we went to a party organized by the Chambre de Commerce Israel-France thanks to celebrate the Independance Day in Israel. And after that, we moved to a roof-top party, but it’s another story…

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Day 4: what we have seen or learned in Tel Aviv

Here is a list of what we have seen or learned today in Tel Aviv:

  • Israeli cuisine is not just hummus. It’s also shakshuka!
  • 1/3 of the population of Tel Aviv is less than 25.
  • A lot of shops are closed during independance day (on April 25th), and everybody celebrates it. The State of Israel is still very young (it was created in 1947).

The anecdote of the day: innovation in a taxi

We spend some time in taxis to go from a company to another, and as most of the taxi drivers can speak English, we talk to them and they told us some interesting stories. For example, Giorgio met a taxi driver who told him he just created his high-tech company! He gave him his visiting card.

Guy met another taxi driver who showed him rearview mirror coversprinted with the Israeli flag saying “look at that, they just invented it!”.

Start-ups are created everywhere, even in a taxi.

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Day 3: what we have seen or learned in Nazareth

Here is a list of what we have seen or learned today in Nazareth:

  • hummus is heavy.
  • you can’t enter a church dressed with a skirt.
  • you can easily meet a priest and add him on Linked In, as Ricardo did.
  • the separation beteween arabic and Jews is visible in the city.
  • green is the color of Islam. Arabic cities are illuminated with green lights at night.

The anecdote of the day: passport n°001

Chaim Weizmann, who gave his name to the famous Weizmann Institute we visited, was the 1st president of the State of Israel. So his Israeli passport had the number 001. Quite easy to remember!

The city of Nazareth

The city of Nazareth

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Day 2: what we have seen or learned in Haifa

Here is a list of what we have seen or learned today in Haifa:

  • The average age of 1st year students at university is 25 (due to military service).
  • The cost of living is higher than what we imagined, particularly in supermarkets.
  • We are surprised we still have not seen any policeman or soldier in the street.
  • Food seems to be very important in innovative companies (provide free food and drinks to make your employees more innovative!).
  • After the military service, young people often travel all over the world, in Asia, South America, or anywhere else.
  • Houtspa! It’s a Hebrew word to describe the Israeli people’s state of mind. It’s hard to translate. It’s a mix between courage, crazy and nerve.
  • Road signs are written in Hebrew, Arabic and English (lucky us!).
On the road, from Haifa to Tel Aviv

On the road, from Haifa to Tel Aviv

The anecdote of the day:

Around 2,000 French people emigrate to Israel each year. And around 600 coffins travel from France to Israel each year. It concerns French people who decided to be buried in Israel after their death. And guess what? This is a very profitable business for some companies, since families often accompany the deceased to the funeral in Israel.

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